LP2/ Q2 – Examples

Examples of consistency can be found everywhere around ordinary life. Here is the list of three examples of consistency.

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One example of aesthetic consistency is seen in Virgin logos. These three logos are silar in color and style though they promote different goods. The company use these logos through all their products, so that they can explore new market providing recognition of the company’s reputation within the new business avenues. DiMirco (2010, p. 85) points out that ‘companies use the same color, fronts, and icons throughout their marketing materials to create a consistent experience for the customer through recognition and association ’.

power plug

panel

Another example is functional consistency. This can be seen in remote control panels. A small circle button which represents ‘turn on/off’ can be seen on almost every electric devises, such as laptops, televisions and audio equipment. Also, upward/ downward triangles symbolize ‘up or down’, as used to control heating on air-conditioners or volume on audio devices. DiMirco (2010, p. 85) also explains that functional consistency has an effect on the placement of navigation buttons, and the ease of use of online forms. Their use enables people to use devices easily even if they have not used the particular machine before because of these familiar symbols. This functional consistency helps users to navigate new fields and products.

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phone tenki

The last example is external consistency which can be seen on the layout of numbered keypads. The number line starts from the upper left corner on phones or remote control panels, whereas it starts from the lower right hand corner on calculators or computer keyboards. The function of the panel is the same but the way it is used is different. This shows a consistency with other elements in a different environment, and this expands the benefits of internal consistency (Lidwell, Holden & Butler, 2003).

References
DiMarco, J. (2010). Digital design for print and web: an introduction to theory, principles, and techniques. Retrieved from http://www.eblub.com.au/

Lidwell, W., Holden, K., & Butler, J. (2003). Aesthetic‐Usability Effect. In Universal Principles of Design (pp. 46). Massachusetts: Rockport.

[Untitled photograph of Virgin logo]. Retrieved October 26, 2014, from:
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_PDjWOXhNtSw/SgzuqBbXzMI/AAAAAAAAABU/KSp7GiNWQGU/s320/blog7.jpg,

[Untitled photograph of control panel]. Retrieved October 26, 2014, from:
http://benbengo.michikusa.jp/mennte01/IMG_1398.JPG,

[Untitled photograph of control panel]. Retrieved October 26, 2014, from:
http://favorite-pc.com/image/inspiron1720/bodycheck10.jpg,

[Untitled photograph of laptop calculation]. Retrieved October 26, 2014, from:
http://favorite-pc.com/image/inspiron1720/bodycheck10.jpg,

[Untitled photograph of phone calculation]. Retrieved October 26, 2014, from:
http://livedoor.blogimg.jp/smaxjp/imgs/0/6/061562d1.jpg,

LP2/ Q1 – Summary

Useful designs and systems are essential for all users, and consistency a significant factor towards achieving this. Consistency is defined as what helps people with transferring knowledge, learning new things quickly, and focusing on relevant aspects of a task (Lidwell, Holden & Butler, 2003). There are four kinds of consistency: aesthetic, functional, internal, and external.

Firstly, consistency is needed for good design, as is aesthetic consistency. This is composed of style and appearance, and helps users to recognize brands and their associated value, or enhance consumer’s perspective of purchase. Companies use the same color, fronts, and icons throughout their marketing materials so that customers can experience consistent recognition and association (DiMarco, 2010, p. 51). Thus, aesthetic consistency is significant for good design which can attract customers.

Secondly, aesthetic consistency helps achieve a good design through functional consistency. This refers to products of products of the same type used in similar ways and designs. The consistency of function enables user to learn the tips within a new environment. DiMarco (2010, p. 51) also explains this saying that functional consistency leads to creating implied meaning for users and they can be transparently guided by hierarchy.

Thirdly, consistency is used for a good system as internal consistency. This means consistency which can be seen with other elements in the system. According to Zuschlag (2010), users ‘can generally count on your products being regarded as its own cognitive context within the larger context of common metaphors, as well as other products and operating systems’. Also, functional consistency must be involved within any logical grouping elements.

Lastly, consistency that is important for good designs is external consistency. This explores the merit of internal consistency to outside, but it is hard to make. Cole (2012) claims that learning on external convention is useful nevertheless the difficulty of breaking away from what others are doing.

In conclusion, there are four elements of consistency: aesthetic, functional, internal and external. Each one of these elements are essential for a good, functional system.

Reference
Cole, D. Why Is Consistency Important in Design? Retrieved from http://www.slate.com/blogs/quora/2012/12/24/why_is_consistency_important_in_design.html

DiMarco, J. (2010). Digital design for print and web: an introduction to theory, principles, and techniques. Retrieved from http://www.eblub.com.au/

Lidwell, W., Holden, K., & Butler, J. (2003). Aesthetic‐Usability Effect. In Universal Principles of Design (pp. 46). Massachusetts: Rockport.

Zushlag, M. (2010). Achieving and Balancing Consistency in User Interface Design. Retrieved from http://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2010/07/achieving-and-balancing-consistency-in-user-interface-design.php#sthash.UE8AAD7x.dpuf